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Perfecting Persian Lamb

March 22, 2015

The novelty of being back in Plymouth is wearing off slightly, and I’m settling in to the rhythms of my job. This, it seems, is the worst time for suddenly being struck by second-home-sickness. The most ridiculous things will set me off (really, who cries when they hear Kurt Darren, except in despair for the state of music these days). It’s been an up and down few weeks, but I’m trying to be proactive about dealing with the downs.

I tend to use cooking as stress relief. I find the focus required to create an interesting dinner a really good form of distraction from whatever is bothering me. Particularly if I’m working with new ingredients or inspiration from cuisines I’m not familiar with. The last few weeks I’ve been looking in to the history of Persian and related regional cuisines. I bought a beautiful book called Persiana by Sabrina Ghayour and have been using my fantastic flavour thesaurus by Niki Sugent to explore typical flavour combinations.

Lamb is a frequent feature of many recipes I looked at, but I don’t tend to be one to go shopping for specific ingredients for recipes. This makes Persian style cooking a little challenging in that I don’t tend to keep things like pomegranates around and I’m still rebuilding my spice collection, so saffron is out. But I did have a big pack of lamb mince to work with.

Two dishes arose, inspired by my reading. First, a cardamom and lemon lamb meatball dish, with roasted cauliflower, cashews, carrot pickle and tahini sauce. Then a lamb and pistachio meatball and fig tagine with mojardara.

The first dish was rich and delicious and perfect for our current preference for eating few processed and white carbs (less bread, rice, pasta, potatoes etc). I personally find this keeps my energy levels more constant throughout the day, and reduces the portion sizes I tend to eat.

This to serve two.

Ingredients

Half a pack of lamb mince (250g)
3 cardamom pods
1 tsp of Ras El Hanout
1 small cauliflower/half a large one
A handful of cashew nuts
1 lemon
2 carrots
A splash of white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons of tahini
1 clove minced garlic
Parsley to garnish
Olive oil/coconut oil

Method

First, make the meatballs. Mix the lamb mince with the zest of the lemon. Crush the cardamom pods to get the interior seeds, crush these and add to the lamb mix. Form in to meatballs of desired size.

Slice the cauliflower in to 1 cm slices or florets depending on how you would prefer for presentation, I like slices. Drizzle with some oil (I mostly use coconut or a light olive oil) and sprinkle with ras el hanout.
Put the meatballs and the cauliflower on to a tray and bake in a medium (180 or so) oven until they are nice and brown and the cauliflower have softened (time will depend on size).

To make the tahini sauce, mix the juice of the lemon with the tahini and a dash of olive oil and season with some ground pepper.

Grate the carrot and dress with the white wine vinegar.

To serve, stack the meat balls on top of the cauliflower, drizzle with tahini sauce and garnish with parsley, crushed cashews and the pickled carrot on the side.

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Inspired by the success of the first dish I decided to use the rest of the lamb mince for the other dish, fancying something with maybe a sweeter and more tomato based sauce.

This also to serve two.

Ingredients

Half a pack of lamb mince (250g)
1 yellow pepper
1 red onion
1 tin of tomatoes
A handful of pistachio nuts
6 dried figs, quartered.
1 tsp ras el hanout
100g rice
100g lentils
1 white onion
2 tsp cumin seeds
2 tsp yellow mustard seeds
1 tsp ground coriander
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp turmeric
Oil for frying (I used rapeseed oil)

Mint and parsley for garnish.

Method

First make the meat balls by mixing the lamb with the pistachios (chopped finely). Lightly brown these in a frying pan. In another pan (saucepan or frying pan, see next point), fry the red onion (roughly chopped) until soft. At this point you can use a proper tagine pot (mine is on a ship somewhere mid-Atlantic) or continue in a saucepan. Add the yellow pepper (chopped in to sizeable chunks), the tomatoes, the figs, the ras el hanout and the browned meatballs. Bake in the tagine or simmer until the sauce has thicken beautifully.

Meanwhile make the mojardara (rice and lentils). This recipe is a mix between the one in Persiana and from the Cranks Bible by Nadine Abensur – also an excellent book. Cook the rice and lentils separately (tinned lentils will speed this up). While these are cooking add a decent amount of oil to the meat ball pan. Slice the white onion thinly and fry until crisp. Put these aside, add the cumin, mustard seeds, coriander, cinnamon and turmeric to the pan. Fry lightly until aromatic. Add the rice and lentils and combine, before mixing the crispy onions through,

Serve the tagine on top of the mojardara and garnish with mini and parsley. It would probably also be nice with a little yoghurt or feta, though I didn’t have and and it was still delicious. We had ours with a bottle of the Fire Flower Shiraz Mourvèdre from South Africa – bought at Waitrose.

I highly recommend making extra mojardara. It lasts in the fridge, makes a great lunch or breakfast (top it with a fried egg) and the combination of rice and lentils is much better than just having the rice.

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I was pleased with both these dishes, but I’ve got lots more ideas to experiment with yet. These dishes can take a little bit of time, which is often fine for me, but not everyone, so my next challenge may well be some simpler dishes for busier days.

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. March 22, 2015 7:59 pm

    As much as I reeeally want to like lamb, the smell just makes me gag – but these look SO yummy I am going to substitute with beef mince and try it 😀

    • March 23, 2015 11:43 am

      I also find the smell of lamb to be quite pungent at times! Love the taste though. Think this would definitely work fine with beef, or maybe ostrich, if you can get your hands on any! 🙂

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