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October optics adventures!

October 7, 2012

Lack of blogging (particularly on the food side) is a good indication that I’m working towards something pretty special in my scientific research.

During the last month I’ve been pushing my programming skills to the limit with my PhD research to get as much done as possible before jetting off from Cape Town to attend the biggest conference of my career so far, followed by a meeting with the European Space Agency in preparation for the launch of their new ocean colour satellite.

The ocean optics conference is held every two years. This year it is being held in Glasgow, which is where I’m writing to you from right now! Oral presentation and poster sessions will cover a huge range of topics within the field of optics in the global oceans, including: Remote sensing, shallow water, ecosystem models, high latitudes, phytoplankton, particles and environmental management. It promises to be a great conference, with workshops on processing and data management and various meetings taking place around the central event. I will be presenting both an oral presentation and a poster about my work so far – see my abstract here. I’ll also be attending a user meeting to discuss the fantastic instrument HICO – located on the international space station.

Following ocean optics, I’ll be jumping on another plane to Frascati, just outside of Rome, Italy to visit the European Space Research Institute (ESRIN) for the Sentinel-3 OLCI/SLSTR and MERIS/(A)ATSR workshop. After the loss of ENVISAT and the MERIS instrument aboard earlier this year, we’ve struggled to get good satellite coverage of my research region. Though we are now pursuing the use of hyperspectral data from HICO, we could really do with getting data regularly, as we did with ENVISAT/MERIS. The European Space Agency (ESA) will be launching a constellation of replacements for the ENVISAT satellite from next year. The workshop in Frascati will focus on one of these satellites (Sentinel 3) and one instrument in particular – the Ocean Land Colour Instrument (OLCI). I’ll be presenting a broad overview of our current and future research in South Africa and hopefully will learn a lot on both the technical side of the launch plans and from other researchers hoping to use the data.

Follow me on twitter – @HayleyEversKing for day to day updates about both ocean optics (I’ll be encouraging others to tweet under the hashtag #oceanoptics2012) and the ESA workshop. I’ll be doing some follow up posts on thoughts and overviews of some talks when I get back to Cape Town!

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. October 7, 2012 9:48 pm

    I understood so little of what that really means, but I imagine lots of pretty colours and I know it’s lots of travelling and knowledging so therefore I think it’s happy!

  2. Joeline permalink
    October 8, 2012 9:14 am

    Wow! It seems the pretty lady is more than busy and doing wonderful altogether, adorable, Thanks for sharing this Hayley and all the best. Me finger-crossed since i know that all the experience there will be shared equally with others ” I am a witness” Just missing you at the same time

  3. Martyn permalink
    October 11, 2012 12:24 pm

    Enjoy your ‘hopping on planes’, I know what is behind those lines.

    I was at a Health, Safety and Environment conference this week and found to my surprise that there is a substantial ‘pod’ of whale sharks in the Arabian Gulf around one of the Qatar offshore fields. The pod has been surveyed to include up to 100 animals and is now under study by Herriot Watt University. It seems they have historically been seen in small numbers, but until now it had not been realised how many they were, or they have increased. The thermal data on the Gulf shows some deep cool water and there are abundant small fish and eggs at surface level resulting from the banned fishing grounds round the rigs and their action as ‘artificial reef’. I guess we are not used to saying well done to the oil industry, but this is a benefit we should aknowledge?

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